cover_article_newsongs

Two new songs in store: Garage Band and Still Doin’ It

Two new songs in store: Garage Band and Still Doin’ It.

Garage Band:

This is what I always wanted a garage band to sound like; equal parts rock guitar, funky bass, jazzy lines and Hammond organ. Actually when I listen back to this I can hear the incredible influence that Joe Satriani had on me in my high school days. I listened to his Extremist album on my walkman more times that I can count. I am surprised I didn’t break the tape. I could have cut it down and made it shorter but in the end I decided to let it go on for almost 7 minutes. Just couldn’t get enough of the groove.

Still Doin’ It:

This title really sums up where I am at. I have been a musician for practically my whole life. And I am still here playing, still here having a blast riffing on a groove, grooving on a riff. When I wrote this riff it was so much fun to play that I decided the whole band needed to play it. From there we enter a section that adds a bit of tension. What day goes by that doesn’t have an element of that? From there we release into a more standard grooving part before coming back to that fun riff. Featured on tenor sax is my long time friend and collaborator Dan Puccio. Dan has spoiled me because for a long time I believed that all tenor sax players could play with that much range and killer sound. Dan is a lot like me, he is still soldering on through this game of music, he is still doin’ it.

Go and check it!

(Illustrations by Pablo Lara H)

New Images Featured Sizes_featured at_newyokcitybass

Interview at NYCBass blog

If you have not heard about NYCBass blog, you have to.

The NYCBass blog is about “Interviewing and profiling local bass players from the greater new york city area. NYCBass will also provide tips about how to “survive” as a bass player in New York City while maintaining your sanity and not going completely broke.”

The blogger behind is Joseph Wallace, who defines himself as ” …a double and electric bass specialist from the greater new york metropolitan area. He has vast live and studio experience with multiple genres including classical, jazz, rock, pop, r&b, musical theater and more. Joseph possesses a B.A. in Music Education from Montclair State University and has studied with Linda McKnight, Mike Richmond and Bill Moring.”

Well, Bob DiGiacomo was interviewed today in this great blog.

Read the full interview here:

http://nycbass.tumblr.com/post/10993949236/interview-with-bob-digiacomo

And read the full site, of course.

Musician_Corner_VIII

Musician’s Corner Part VIII

Welcome back to the Musician’s Corner. Previously, we took a look at the C major scale and from it we derived all of the naturally occurring modes. Today we are going to continue to analyze the C scale, but instead, shift our focus to the chords that can be created from it.

More specifically, today we are going to build triads. A triad is exactly what you might guess, a group of three notes. Even though more interesting and cool sounding chords can be built with more notes, doing this would be jumping ahead of our selves. A solid understanding of the triads on which more complex chords are constructed will not only give you a better understanding of the larger structures, but also allow you to take this knowledge into any style you wish. Jazz relies on these larger structures but all western music has these more basic triadic structures in common.

Continue reading Musician’s Corner Part VIII